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, advances in technology, a whole host of technologies, gave government officials the power to invade individual privacy in a whole host of new ways. new ways, mr. president, that the founding fathers never dreamed of, and all through those days the congress and the courts struggled to keep up. time and time again, congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles of the fourth amendment. and it's striking, mr. president, if you look at a lot of the debates that we're having today about the internet and the presiding officer has had a great interest in this, we've talked often about it, certainly the founding fathers could never have envisioned tweeting and twitter and the internet and all of these extraordinary, you know, technologies, but what we have seen as technology has continued to bring us this treasure trove of information, all of these spectacular opportunities, the founding fathers never envisioned, we saw that time and time again, that congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles o
pulling location so there are technological advances and things that we can do. there's no federal money. we salute all little bit of it left in arizona that we will make probably available to the counties as may be matching a thing to address the renewal of our equipment but the resources are getting very thin. >> i appreciate that input and it strikes me as compelling. i have one last question. >> would you agree i at the leipheimer testimony the access is diminished by long waiting times and we should be concerned about this impact to read a recent study showed that in this election in 2012, 22% of african-americans, 24% of latinos had to wait more than 30 minutes but only 9 percent of the caucasian or white voters had to wait 30 minutes or longer. would you care to think that show with me what can be done to remedy and what does it say about the continued value of the voting rights act at the time the supreme court is reviewing its appropriateness? >> thank you. i don't have an explanation for why there are longer lines for some minority groups nationwide. i think the explanation may
made necessary by new technology. but congress has failed to do this. some court rulings have likewise fallen short of protecting the full scope -- the full spirit of the fourth amendment as it applies to our world of complex data sharing. courts have attempted in good faith to determine whether individuals have a reasonable expectation of privacy in different kinds of information that they might share to third parties, sometimes online. but the result of many of these rulings is a varied and unpredictable legal landscape in which many don't know and can't figure out whether they can rely on the fourth amendment to protect sensitive information that they routinely share with others for a limited business purpose. congress needs to act to preserve the fourth amendment's protections as they apply to everyday uses including routine use of the internet, use of credit cards, libraries and banks. absent such protections, individuals may in time grow weary of sharing information with third parties. i'm cognizant that this area of the law is complex. it's full of changes and full of instances
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

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